The world in 100 people

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OLD DOGS‏

An old German Shepherd starts chasing rabbits and before long, discovers that he’s lost. Wandering about, he notices a panther heading rapidly in his direction with the intention of having lunch.

The old German Shepherd thinks, “Oh, oh! I’m in deep shit now!”

Noticing some bones on the ground close by, he immediately settles down to chew on the bones with his back to the approaching cat. Just as the panther is about to leap, the old German Shepherd exclaims loudly,

“Boy, that was one delicious panther! I wonder, if there are any more around here?”

Hearing this, the young panther halts his attack in mid-strike, a look of terror comes over him and he slinks away into the trees.

“Whew!,” says the panther, “That was close! That old German Shepherd nearly had me!”

Meanwhile, a squirrel who had been watching the whole scene from a nearby tree, figures he can put this knowledge to good use and trade it for protection from the panther. So, off he goes.

The squirrel soon catches up with the panther, spills the beans and strikes a deal for himself with the panther.

The young panther is furious at being made a fool of and says, “Here, squirrel, hop on my back and see what’s going to happen to that conniving canine!”

Now, the old German Shepherd sees the panther coming with the squirrel on his back and thinks, “What am I going to do now?,” but instead of running, the dog sits down with his back to his attackers, pretending he hasn’t seen them yet, and just when they get close enough to hear, the old German Shepherd says…

“Where’s that squirrel? I sent him off an hour ago to bring me another panther!”

Moral of this story…

Don’t mess with the old dogs… Age and skill will always overcome youth and treachery! BS and brilliance only come with age and experience.

A Glass of Wine

A Glass of Wine_001A Glass of Wine_002A Glass of Wine_003

HISTORY OF THE CAR RADIO

Seems like cars have always had radios, but they didn’t. Here’s the true story:

One evening, in 1929, two young men named William Lear and Elmer Wavering drove their girlfriends to a lookout point high above the Mississippi River town of Quincy, Illinois, to watch the sunset.  It was a romantic night to be sure, but one of the women observed that it would be even nicer if they could listen to music in the car.

Lear and Wavering liked the idea. Both men had tinkered with radios (Lear, had served as a radio operator in the U.S. Navy during World War I) and it wasn’t long before they were taking apart a home radio and trying to get it to work in a car.

But it wasn’t as easy as it sounds: automobiles have ignition switches, generators, spark plugs, and other electrical equipment that generate noisy static interference, making it nearly impossible to listen to the radio when the engine was running.

One by one Lear and Wavering identified and eliminated each source of electrical interference.
When they finally got their radio to work, they took it to a radio convention in Chicago.

There they met Paul Galvin, owner of Galvin Manufacturing Corporation.  He made a product called a “battery eliminator” a device that  allowed battery-powered radios to run on household AC current.  But as more homes were wired for electricity more radio manufacturers made AC-powered radios.

Galvin needed a new product to manufacture.  When he met Lear and Wavering at the radio convention, he found it.  He believed that mass-produced, affordable car radios had the potential to become a huge business.

Lear and Wavering set up shop in Galvin’s factory and when they perfected their first radio they installed it in his Studebaker. Then Galvin went to a local banker to apply for a loan. Thinking it might sweeten the deal, he had his men install a radio in the banker’s Packard.  Good idea, but it didn’t work — Half an hour after the installation the banker’s Packard caught on fire. (They didn’t get the loan.)

Galvin didn’t give up.  He drove his Studebaker nearly 800 miles to Atlantic City to show off the radio at the 1930 Radio Manufacturers Association convention.  Too broke to afford a booth, he parked the car outside the convention hall and cranked up the radio so that passing conventioneers could hear it.

That idea worked — He got enough orders to put the radio into production.

WHAT’S IN A NAME

That first production model was called the 5T71.  Galvin decided he needed to come up with something a little catchier.  In those days many companies in the phonograph and radio businesses used the suffix “ola” for their names – Radiola, Columbiola, and Victrola were three of the biggest. Galvin decided to do the same thing, and since his radio was intended for use in a motor vehicle, he decided to call it the Motorola.  But even with the name change the radio still had problems: When Motorola went on sale in 1930 it cost about $110 uninstalled, at a time when you could buy a brand-new car for $650 and the country was sliding into the Great Depression.   (By that measure, a radio for a new car would cost about $3,000 today.)  In 1930 it took two men several days to put in a car radio –The dashboard had to be taken apart so that the receiver and a single speaker could be installed, and the ceiling had to be cut open to install the antenna.

These early radios ran on their own batteries, not on the car battery, so holes had to be cut into the floorboard to accommodate them. The installation manual had eight complete diagrams and 28 pages of instructions.

Selling complicated car radios that cost 20 percent of the price of a  brand-new car wouldn’t have been easy in the best of times, let alone during the Great Depression — Galvin lost money in 1930 and struggled for a couple of years after that.  But things picked up in 1933 when Ford began offering Motorolas pre-installed at the factory.

In 1934 they got another boost when Galvin struck a deal with B.F. Goodrich tire company to sell and install them in its chain of tire stores.  By then the price of the radio, installation included, had dropped to $55. The Motorola car radio was off and running.  (The name of the company would be officially changed from Galvin Manufacturing to “Motorola” in 1947.)

In the meantime Galvin continued to develop new uses for car radios. In 1936, the same year that it introduced push-button tuning, it also introduced the Motorola Police Cruiser, a standard car radio that was factory preset to a single frequency to pick up police broadcasts.

In 1940 he developed with the first handheld two-way radio — The Handie-Talkie — for the U. S. Army.

A lot of the communications technologies that we take for granted today were born in Motorola labs in the years that followed World War II.

In 1947 they came out with the first television to sell under $200.  In 1956 the company introduced the world’s first pager; in 1969 it supplied the radio and television equipment that was used to televise Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the Moon.  In 1973 it invented the world’s first handheld cellular phone.  Today Motorola is one of the largest cell phone manufacturer in the world –And it all started with the car radio.

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO

The two men who installed the first radio in Paul Galvin’s car?  Elmer Wavering and William Lear ended up taking very different paths in life.

Wavering stayed with Motorola. In the 1950’s he helped change the automobile experience again when he developed the first automotive alternator, replacing inefficient and unreliable generators. The invention lead to such luxuries as power windows, power seats, and, eventually air-conditioning.

Lear also continued inventing.  He holds more than 150 patents. Remember eight-track tape players? Lear invented that.  But what he’s really famous for are his contributions to the field of aviation.  He invented radio direction finders for planes, aided in the invention of the autopilot, designed the first fully automatic aircraft landing system, and in 1963 introduced his most famous invention of all, the Lear Jet, the world’s first mass-produced, affordable business jet. (Not bad for a guy who dropped out of school after the eighth grade.)

Sometimes it is fun to find out how some of the many things that we take for granted actually came into being! And It all started with a woman’s suggestion!

Bugger the Bankers

MEET MOLLY

A most heartwarming story—beats the heck out of murders, politics and terrorists!

MEET MOLLY_001

She’s a gray speckled pony who was abandoned by her owners when Hurricane Katrina hit southern Louisiana . She spent weeks on her own before finally being rescued and taken to a farm where abandoned animals were stockpiled.

While there, she was attacked by a dog and almost died. Her gnawed right front leg became infected, and her vet went to LSU for help, but LSU was overwhelmed, and this pony was a welfare case. You know how that goes.

But after surgeon Rustin Moore met Molly, he changed his mind. He saw how the pony was careful to lie down on different sides so she didn’t seem to get sores, and how she allowed people to handle her.

She protected her injured leg. She constantly shifted her weight and didn’t overload her good leg.
She was a smart pony with a serious survival ethic.

Moore agreed to remove her leg below the knee, and a temporary artificial limb was built.
Molly walked out of the clinic and her story really begins there.

‘This was the right horse and the right owner,’ Moore insists. Molly happened to be a one-in-a-million patient. She’s tough as nails, but sweet, and she was willing to cope with pain.

She made it obvious she understood that she was in trouble. The other important factor, according to Moore, is having a truly committed and compliant owner who is dedicated to providing the daily care
required over the lifetime of the horse.

Molly’s story turns into a parable for life in Post-Katrina Louisiana ………

The little pony gained weight, and her mane finally felt a comb.

A human prosthesis designer built her a leg. The prosthetic has given Molly a whole new life,

Allison Barca, DVM, Molly’s regular vet, reports.

And she asks for it. She will put her little limb out, and come to you and let you know that she wants you to put it on. Sometimes she wants you to take it off too. And sometimes, Molly gets away from Barca.
‘It can be pretty bad when you can’t catch a three-legged horse,’ she laughs.

Most important of all, Molly has a job now. Kay, the rescue farm owner, started taking Molly to shelters, hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation centers. Anywhere she thought that people needed hope. Wherever Molly went, she showed people her pluck. She inspired people, and she had a good time doing it.

‘It’s obvious to me that Molly had a bigger role to play in life, Moore said. She survived the hurricane, she survived a horrible injury, and now she is giving hope to others.’ Barca concluded, ‘She’s not back to normal,
but she’s going to be better. To me, she could be a Symbol for New Orleans itself.’

MEET MOLLY_002

This is Molly’s most recent prosthesis. The bottom photo shows the ground surface that she stands on, which has a smiley face embossed in it. Wherever Molly goes, she leaves a smiley hoof print behind.

MEET MOLLY_003

If you feel like it, forward this and share it with all of the Animal lovers that you know. God’s creatures often reflect the character we aspire to.

Life’s Too Short For The Wrong Job

There is an employment agency in Germany.  One of their advertising gimmicks is putting these 3D posters on various machines throughout Germany.

Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_005 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_006 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_007 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_008 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_009 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_002 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_003 Life's Too Short For The Wrong Job_004

The Genie and the Irish Bic Lighter‏

Mick and Paddy were fishing on the Irish shoreline when Mick pulled out a cigar. Finding he had No matches, he asked Paddy for a light.

‘Ya, sure, I tink I haff a lighter,’ Paddy replied and then reaching into his tackle
box, he pulled out a Bic lighter 10 inches long.
The Genie and the Irish Bic Lighter_001
‘My God, man!’ exclaimed Mick, taking the huge Bic lighter in his hands. ‘Where’d yew git dat monster?’


‘Well,’ replied Paddy, ‘I got it from my Genie.’


‘You haff a Genie?’ Mick asked.


‘Ya, sure. It’s right here in my tackle box,’ says Paddy.


‘Could I see him?’


Paddy opens his tackle box and sure enough, out pops the Genie.
The Genie and the Irish Bic Lighter_002
Addressing the Genie, Mick says, ‘Hey dere! I’m a good pal of your master.
Will you grant me one wish?’


‘Yes, I will,’ says the Genie.


So Mick asks the Genie for a million bucks. The Genie disappears back into the tackle box leaving Mick sitting there waiting for his million bucks.


Shortly, the Irish sky darkens and is filled with the sound of a million ducks flying directly overhead.


The Genie and the Irish Bic Lighter_003

Over the roar of the one million ducks Mick yells at Paddy, ‘What the hell? I asked for a million bucks, not a million ducks!’


Paddy answers, ‘Ya, I forgot to tell yew dat da Genie is hard of hearing. Do yew really tink I asked for a 10 inch Bic?’

A Beauty Pageant Contestant’s Year In Review

January – Took new scarf back to store because it was too tight.
February – Fired from pharmacy job for failing to print labels… Helllloooo!!! Bottles won’t fit in printer!!!
March – Got really excited! Finished jigsaw puzzle in 6 months … box said “2-4 years!”
April – Trapped on escalator for hours … power went out!!
May – Tried to make Kool-Aid … wrong instructions on packet … 8 cups of water won’t fit into those little packets!!
June – Tried to go water skiing … Bummer … couldn’t find a lake with a slope.
July – Lost breast stroke swimming competition … learned later, the other swimmers cheated, they used their arms!
August – Got locked out of my car in rain storm … car swamped because soft-top was open.
September – The capital of California is “C”…..isn’t it??
October – Hate M &M’s …. they are so hard to peel.
November – Burned turkey. Baked it for 4 1/2 days. Instructions said 1 hour per pound and I weigh 108!
December – Couldn’t call 911 …”duh” … like there’s no “eleven” button on the stupid phone!!!
What a year!!

If the NRA…

If the NRA ...